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UCLA Stroke Center in the News

2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

2013

  • Dr. Sidney Starkman and Link to ArticleStroke Team Students Help Save Lives in Emergency Room, Apr, 2013
    Dr. Sidney Starkman on today.ucla.edu -- “Time is brain.” With these words, UCLA professor of emergency medicine and neurology Dr. Sidney Starkman captures the tick-tick-ticking of the crucial minutes following a stroke — a blood clot or rupture of a blood vessel in the brain. “It’s not just a time clock,” Starkman said. “It’s also a tissue clock,” precious brain cells deprived of nourishment ticking off to death in a matter of hours, brain cells responsible for our ability to speak and move, think and feel. This is where Starkman’s 25-student, all-volunteer Stroke Team comes in.
    Article today.ucla.edu.com »

  • Dr. Jeffrey Saver and Link to ArticleNew Heart Procedure May Benefit Younger Stroke Patients, Mar, 2013
    Dr. Jeffrey Saver on examiner.com -- UCLA researchers have participated in multi-center study addressing stroke prevention among younger patients who have a defect in the upper chamber of their heart. The researchers’ evaluation of a new heart hole closure device was published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The investigators attempted to determine the best treatment to prevent further strokes--whether closing the hole with a button device, along with anti-clotting medicines, or just anti-clotting medicines alone.
    Article examiner.com » | Additional Coverage: healthcanal.com » | uk.reuters.com »

  • Dr. Jeffrey Saver and Link to ArticleUCLA Stroke Center Gets 'Comprehensive' Certification, Mar, 2013
    Dr. Jeffrey Saver on centurycity.patch.com -- The UCLA Stroke Center has been certified as a comprehensive stroke center by a national accrediting group, the school announced last week. The certification, by the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, marks UCLA as one of the first 10 centers nationwide to receive the designation. "This is a true team effort, reflecting the efforts of over 200 physicians, nurses, therapists, pharmacists and technologists," said Dr. Jeffrey Saver, a UCLA neurologist who serves as the center's director.
    Article centurycity.patch.com » | Additional Coverage: examiner.com »

UCLA Stroke Center
receives Achievement Award
Learn more » 

2012 Get with the Guidelines Gold Plus

2012

  • New Device to Remove Stroke-Causing Blood Clots Proves Better than Standard Tool (Aug 2012)
    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and a common cause of long-term disability in the United States, but doctors have very few proven treatment methods. Now a new device that mechanically removes stroke-causing clots from the brain is being hailed as a game-changer. More »

  • A More Effective Revascularization Device for Stroke? (Mar 2012)
    By Lauren LeBano, Neurologyreviews.com
    Jeffrey L. Saver, MD, lead study author and Professor of Neurology and Director of the Stroke Center at the Geffen School of Medicine, University of California in Los Angeles, reported results of the Solitaire With the Intention for Thrombectomy (SWIFT) trial, a multicenter, randomized, noninferiority study that was the first of its kind to directly compare revascularization techniques. More » | Audiocast »
  • New Device is More Effective and Safer Than FDA-Approved Treatment for Acute Stroke Patients (Feb 2012)
    By Brian Dodson, Gizmag.com
    A new approach to stroke treatment initially developed by Dr. Jeffrey Saver's group at the UCLA Stroke Center combines the ability to restore circulation and remove clots using only a single device ... and it's showing significant promise in trials. More »
  • UCLA Stroke Center Researcher Honored (Feb 2012)
    By Staff Reports, Ventura County Star
    Dr. Jeffrey L. Saver of Thousand Oaks, professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, received the William Feinberg Award for Excellence in Clinical Stroke at the American Stroke Association's 2012 International Stroke Conference in New Orleans on Feb. 2. More »
  • Clot Remover Proves Mettle in Ischemic Stroke (Feb 2012)
    By Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today
    The percentage of patients with acute ischemic stroke who achieved successful revascularization without symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was significantly greater with the Solitaire device, according to Jeffrey Saver, MD, of the University of California Los Angeles. More »
  • Solitaire Trumped Merci in Stroke Clot Retrieval Trial (Feb 2012)
    By Michele G. Sullivan, Clinical Psychiatry News Digital Network
    The SWIFT study intended to randomize 200 patients with ischemic stroke to treatment with either of the devices, but after 18 months, the trial’s data safety monitoring board stopped the study with 144 patients treated, citing "an overwhelming benefit" of the Solitaire-Flow Restoration device over the Merci device, Dr. Jeffrey Saver said at the International Stroke Conference. More »
  • UCLA Researchers Report New Stroke Treatment (Feb 2012)
    By Robin Wulffson, M.D. LA Health Examiner
    A research team led by Jeffrey L. Saver, MD from the UCLA Stroke Center has reported that an experimental device for removing blood clots in stroke patients dramatically outperformed the standard mechanical treatment. Dr. Saver presented the findings on February 3 at the American Stroke Association's 2012 international conference in New Orleans, Louisiana. More »
  • Many Stroke Victims Still Don't Get Treated Fast Enough: Study (Feb 2012)
    By Randy Dotinga HealthDay Reporter
    Dr. David S. Liebeskind, associate clinical professor of neurology, was quoted Feb. 3 by HealthDay News about a new study finding that many stroke victims don’t get to the emergency room fast enough to receive a clot-busting medication. More »
  • Heart Association Honors Stroke Expert (Feb 2012)
    By Robin Wulffson, M.D. LA Health Examiner
    Dr. Jeffery Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, received the William Feinberg Award for Excellence in Clinical Stroke from the American Stroke Association at the group's 2012 international conference. More »
  • Stroke Patients Maintain Benefits of Robot Therapy (Jan 2012)
    By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK
    Dr. Bruce Dobkin, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Neurologic Rehabilitation and Research Program, was quoted Jan.12 by Reuters about a robotic machine that simulates walking for stroke patients who have lost the use of their legs. The article appeared in a dozen other newspapers, including the Chicago Tribune and Baltimore Sun. More »

2011

  • Brain Damage From Stroke Reduced With Natural Protein Given Up To 12 Hours Later (July 2011)
    By Catharine Paddock, Medical News Today 2011
    Dr. Tom Carmichael, associate professor of neurology at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and a member of the UCLA Stroke Center, was quoted July 26 in a Medical News Today article about a Stanford study that found brain damage from stroke could be reduced by giving a natural protein. More »
  • Coffee, exercise may raise stroke risk for some (May 2011)
    By Matt McMillen, Health.com 2011 10:19 a.m. EDT
    Having sex, drinking coffee, working out -- these and other everyday activities that cause blood pressure to spike may briefly raise the risk of a burst aneurysm in the brains of certain vulnerable people, a new study suggests. More »
  • Study finds blacks who have strokes call relatives before 911 (May 2011)
    By Mary Brophy Marcus, USA TODAY
    Most blacks ring up a friend or relative, not 911, when they have stroke symptoms, a new study suggests. In the study, published today online in the journal Stroke, Georgetown University Medical Center researchers surveyed 253 community volunteers living in a predominantly black, urban area of Washington, D.C., about how they would handle stroke symptoms. Eighty-nine percent said that they would call 911 first. More »
  • L.A. Times Hospital Guide Touts Medical Experts (March 2011)
    A Los Angeles Times hospital supplement tapped the expertise of UCLA medical experts on various health care topics, including stroke. Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, outlined information about strokes and offered tips to help prevent them. “Strokes: A Primer” More »
  • Los Angeles Times health blog about the occurrence of stroke in younger people (March 2011)
    Dr. David Liebeskind, associate neurology director of the UCLA Stroke Center, commented in a Los Angeles Times health blog about the occurrence of stroke in younger people. Nate Dogg's Death -- and the Realities of Stroke in the Young” More »
  • Mysterious On-air Migraine Attracts Network, Local Headlines (Feb 2011)
    Numerous news outlets tapped UCLA experts to comment on a TV reporter who appeared to suffer an on-air stroke but actually experienced a complex migraine with aura and facial numbness that affected her speech.
    Dr. Neil Martin, chair of neurosurgery, also appeared on CBS’ “Early Show;” on NBC-Channel 4 Extra’s “Lifechangers,” and in reports by KCBS-Channel 2 and KCAL-Channel 9.
    “Serene Branson: I'm "Troubled" by Viral Video” More »
    “Serene Branson Talks about Her Live Medical Emergency” More »
    “Serene Branson had 'Complex Migraine,' Her Physician Says” More »
    “Serene Branson's Doctor Talks to 'Extra' about Her Condition” More »
  • HealthDay News about determining when stroke patients are well enough to drive again (Feb 2011)
    Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, commented in HealthDay News about determining when stroke patients are well enough to drive again. He also commented in a Medscape report about a Danish study that looked at the impact of elevated triglyceride levels on stroke risk.
    “Simple Tests Can Tell Who Can Drive after Stroke: Study” More »
    “Higher Triglyceride Levels Linked to Increased Risk for Stroke” More »
  • Media Continue Coverage on Clot-Busting Stroke Treatment Study (Feb 2011)
    Xinhua News Agency and Internal Medicine News and Medscape,  Nurse.com  and  Heart.org covered a new study showing that most acute stroke patients do not receive clot-busting treatment within an hour of arriving at the hospital, despite proven benefits and national guideline recommendations. Study authors Dr. Gregg Fonarow, Eliot Corday Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science and director of the Ahmanson–UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center, and Dr. Jeffrey Saver, a professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, were quoted. 
    “Early Treatment Saves Stroke Victims” More »
    “Shorter Door-to-Needle Times Reduce Stroke Mortality” More »
    “tPA Door-to-Needle Time Exceeds 1 Hour for Most U.S. Stroke Patients”
    “Door-to-Needle Times in Acute Stroke Fall Short at GWTG Hospitals” More »
  • Study of Stroke’s Impact on Oscar Nominees Continues to Draw Coverage (Feb 2011)
    The Wall Street Journal, ABC News online, CNN Health and CTV ( Canada ) and the Baltimore Sun and Science Daily, reported on a recent UCLA Stroke Center study which found that stroke and cardiovascular disease have exacted an enormous toll on Hollywood stars. Study author Hannah Smith, staff research associate at the UCLA Stroke Center, and Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of the UCLA Stroke Center, were quoted.
    “Fame Doesn't Keep Movie Stars from Suffering Strokes” More »
    “Is the Oscar Ticket to Heart Attack, Stroke?” More »
    “Oscar Stars Who've had Strokes ” More »
    “Is an Oscar Nomination a New Risk Factor for Stroke?” More »
  • Associated Press story and a MedPage Today articles (Feb 2011)
    Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, commented in a Associated Press story and a MedPage Today article about a study which found that stroke victims who did physical therapy at home improved their walking ability as well as those who used a high-tech clinical treadmill program.
    “Stroke Rehab Doesn't have to be High-Tech to Help”
    “ASA: Walking Away from Stroke” More »
  • Media Highlights Study Finding Stroke Takes Large Toll on Hollywood Movie Stars (Feb 2011)
    Associated Press, MedPage Today and WebMD reported on a new UCLA Stroke Center study which found that stroke and cardiovascular disease have exacted an enormous toll on Hollywood stars. Study author Hannah Smith, a staff research associate at the UCLA Stroke Center, and Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of the UCLA Stroke Center, were quoted. The AP article was published by more than 100 news outlets including the Los Angeles Daily News, Seattle-Post Intelligencer and AOL News.
    “Starstruck: Fame Doesn't Keep Movie Stars from Suffering Strokes, Heart Attacks, Study Finds”
    “Stroke Takes a Toll on Hollywood Stars” More »
  • HealthDay, MedPage Cover Study on Clot-Busting Stroke Treatment (Feb 2011)
    HealthDay and MedPage Today covered a new study showing that most acute stroke patients do not receive clot-busting treatment within an hour of arriving at the hospital, despite proven benefits and national guideline recommendations. Study authors Dr. Gregg Fonarow, Eliot Corday Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and Science and director of the Ahmanson–UCLA Cardiomyopathy Center, and Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of the UCLA Stroke Center were quoted.  MSN picked up the HealthDay story.
    “Earlier tPA in Hospital Saves Lives” More »
  • Associated Press Reports Stroke Impacting Younger People (Feb 2011)
    The Associated Press reported on a new UCLA study which found that doctors are seeing more strokes related to high blood pressure and clogged arteries in younger people. Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of the UCLA Stroke Center was quoted. The article was published in dozens of publications including the Chicago Sun Times, Washington Post and Forbes.
    “ More Strokes Hitting Young, Middle-Aged People” More »
  • Los Angeles Times study that found antidepressants can help stroke survivors (Jan 2011)
    Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, commented in the Los Angeles Times about a study that found antidepressants can help stroke survivors regain mobility. “After Stroke, Antidepressants Aid in Regaining Mobility” More »
  • World Tennis Magazine article about tennis legend Rod Laver’s successful stroke treatment at UCLA
    The UCLA Stroke Center was referenced in a Dec. 27 World Tennis Magazine article about tennis legend Rod Laver’s successful stroke treatment at UCLA in 1998. “Rod Laver’s Stroke” More »
  • UCLA Stroke Center makes American Heart Association's 'Target: Stroke' honor roll
    The award recognizes that over the most recent three-month review period, at least 50 percent of all eligible ischemic stroke patients at UCLA received the important clot-busting drug known as intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) within 60 minutes of arriving at the hospital. More »

2010

  • Study reveals why brain has limited capacity for repair after stroke, IDs new drug target
    Now, a new UCLA study published Nov. 3 in the journal Nature offers insights into a major limitation in the brain's ability to recover function after a stroke and identifies a promising medical therapy to help overcome this limitation. More »
  • The Doctors Discusses Stroke Prevention
    Dr. Neil Martin, chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, was featured in an Oct 20 segment of the CBS program The Doctors. Martin talked about the latest advances in streating a stroke. More »
  • Blogs discuss Patients Who Skip Their Stroke Meds (Aug 2010)
    The Los Angeles Times' and New York Times' health blogs reported Aug. 9 on a study by Dr. Bruce Ovbiagele, associate professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and director of the Olive View-UCLA stroke program, finding that one in four patients who suffer a mini-stroke do not take prescribed medications that could cut the risk of a repeat stroke or heart attack. 
    "Stroke-preventing Medications are Often Abandoned, Study Shows" More »
    "Stroke Patients Discontinue Medications". More »
  • Stroke Patients and the 'Golden Hour' (June 2010)
    HealthDay News reported Thursday on a study led by Dr. Jeffrey Saver, clinical professor of neurology and director of the UCLA Stroke Center, that found that only a quarter of stroke patients arrive at the hospital within an hour of suffering a stroke - the time when treatment with a clot-dissolving drug is most effective. Saver was quoted. More»
  • More than a Quarter of Stroke Patients Arrive at Get With the Guidelines Hospital Within the Golden Hour. (June 2010)
    "The 'golden hour' refers to the first 60 minutes after stroke onset, when there is the greatest chance to restore blood flow and save threatened tissue," said Dr. Jeffrey L. Saver, study lead author and professor of neurology at the UCLA Stroke Center.  More »
  • Dr. Jeffrey Saver Honored with American Heart Association Physician Volunteer of the Year Award  (June 2010)
    The Volunteer of the Year Award is presented to an individual who has demonstrated the most distinguished commitment and service to the American Heart Association during the past fiscal year and over time. More »
  • UCLA Stroke Center receives Achievement Award
    UCLA Stroke Center received the American Stroke Association's Get with the Guidelines™ Stroke Gold Plus Achievement Award for commitment and success in implementing a higher standard of stroke care by ensuring that stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted standards and recommendations.  More »
  • One in Five Stroke Patients Does Not Get Statin Therapy at Hospital Discharge (May 2010)
    The number of stroke patients given statin prescriptions when discharged from hospitals has increased with time, but nearly one in five still leaves the hospital without the evidence-based treatment, according to a study published in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.  More »
  • Stroke Center Innovators Buy Time, Save Brain (March 2010)
    "Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center houses one of the world's most powerful multidisciplinary stroke programs - a program without walls that draws on the expertise of neurologists, surgeons, radiologists, nurses and basic scientists," says Dr. Jeffrey Saver, professor of neurology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. "In terms of the simultaneous breadth and depth of the program, we are unique in the country." More »
  • UCLA Stroke Center Hosts Congressional Staff Educational Tour (Jan 2010)
    The educational tour provided an overview of UCLA research that is part of the Specialized Program of Translational Research in Acute Stroke (SPOTRIAS) Center-a national network of eight centers that perform early phase clinical projects, share data, and promote new approaches to therapy for acute stroke. More »

2009

  • "Inside the Brain". Extra TV Shows Brain Scans via Cell Phones (July 2009)
    Dr. Neil Martin, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosurgery, and colleagues were featured on a Sept. 12 Extra TV "Lifechangers" segment about technology that allows doctors to view brain scans on cell phones and watch real-time video of surgeries. Watch video »
  • Window for Stroke Treatment Opens Wider  (May 2009)
    The  Chicago Tribune, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel and MedPage Today reported on new American Stroke Association guidelines co-authored by Dr. Jeffrey Saver, clinical professor of neurology and director of the stroke center at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, that expand the recommended window of time in which stroke victims can receive an important clot-busting drug. More »
  • UCLA scientists will work with community partners to improve treatment of disadvantaged minority patients for stroke, heart disease  (April 2009)
    UCLA has been awarded a four-year, $3.89 million grant from the American Heart Association to establish a new research center focused on improving the health of disadvantaged minority patients at risk for stroke and heart attack... More »
  • Coffee may protect against stroke  (Feb 2009)
    Coffee use in the adult population is associated with a reduced prevalence of stroke, according to a UCLA analysis of national health survey data. The study found that the prevalence of stroke and several vascular risk factors decrease as the number of daily cups of coffee increases - despite the tendency among heavy coffee drinkers to smoke... More »
  • Green, black tea can reduce stroke risk  (Feb 2009)
    Drinking at least three cups of green or black tea a day can significantly reduce the risk of stroke, a new UCLA study has found. And the more you drink, the better your odds of staving off a stroke... More »

 

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